Tree planting: Tanjung Bungah remembers the landslide victims

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An update from the Tanjung Bunga Residents Association:

On 11 November, the Tanjong Bunga Residents’ Association (TBRA) will be planting trees at the site of the fateful landslide, which cost the lives of 11 men, all except one, migrant workers.

“We have heard painfully little about plans to compensate the families in Bangladesh and Indonesia who lost sons, fathers, brothers as well as their source of income”, says Agnes James, deputy chair of TBRA.

Since the landslide happened in Tanjong Bungah, the residents want to commemorate the preventable deaths of these victims. Foreign workers, who build our houses, keep our streets and homes clean, are people, not just numbers, not dispensable statistics, now here and gone tomorrow.

The Star of 22 October listed 14 victims by name: one Malaysian, one Pakistani, one from Myanmar, two Indonesians, seven Bangladeshis and two others, Jamal and Rahman of “unknown” nationality. Eleven bodies were found. There were rumours that more workers were swept to their deaths by the sudden mud flow but no confirmation.

A week later, a picture in The Sun, showed Socso handing a cheque for funeral expenses to the Malaysian victim’s mother. It added his parents would receive a monthly pension of RM1,062 for the rest of their lives. The news, however, said nothing at all about the funerals of the foreign workers nor of any compensation for their families.

Companies do not need to pay Socso for foreign workers BUT under the Workmen’s Compensation Act of 1952, the employers must pay for repatriating the bodies and compensate the families for “accidental death at work”.

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The developer, Taman Sri Bunga Sdn Bhd, has been given a week (by Chief Minister Lim Guan Eng) to reach agreements with the buyers who undoubtedly will be having second thoughts…

If only the workers [whoever they are employed by] could have had that luxury.

Our town wants to thank and remember them, wants to ensure their families far away are not forgotten and be given adequate information, recognition and compensation.

At the same time, TBRA is cooperating with the MBPP and the state government by planting trees to make Penang greener and better. The trees they are planting today may replace some of the many lost in the dreadful storm last Saturday night. Replace some of the many crushed by bulldozers that cut into the hills, flattening them for building sites.

The trees will absorb rainwater, hold the soil in place, give shade and help protect us from more floods and landslides.

Update:

Adopt a tree on 11 November, this Saturday!
An hour (maximum 2) of your time (9am)

Come and join us to commemorate the 11 victims of the landslide and at the same time make our town a bit greener.

The Penang state government intends to plant 10,000 trees on that day, 11 November, and TBRA will be helping to do its part. We have received 30 trees from MBPP.

The trees will be planted close to the landslide site as a way for Tanjong Bungah to remember the 11 workers who died in a sudden and awful (and unnecessary) way, right here in our own town.

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The trees we received are both fairly tall (5 feet) and small saplings so there is something for everyone because we will need to dig holes to plant them.

We’ll collect as many tools as possible but if you have a garden hoe or a spade, please bring it. Also bring your own water. We don’t want to leave plastic bottles behind.

Time: We will start around 9am to 9.30am
Venue: Lembah Permai
Lorong Lembah 3, pass TAR College, keep going straight, just opposite the now closed construction site;
or, if you are coming from the other direction: past Tenby School and turn right at the T-junction.

We’ll be planting at the dead end of the road after the two Chinese temples. There will be a TBRA banner.

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19 COMMENTS

  1. Global carbon dioxide emissions were almost flat for three years (2014-2016) bringing much needed optimism, but emissions are expected to increase in 2017.

    The Global Carbon Project (GCP) publishes its annual analysis of trends in the global carbon cycle, highlighting how precarious the recent slowdown in global emissions growth is. The growth in 2017 is predominantly due to stronger emissions growth in China and other developing countries, and the findings highlight that the Paris goals could quickly slip out of reach without concerted efforts to drive emissions down.

    http://www.cicero.uio.no/en/posts/climate-news/global-co2-emissions-likely-to-rise-in-2017

    Global carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels and industry will reach around 37 billion tonnes carbon dioxide in 2017, a record high. Global carbon dioxide emissions from all human activities (fossil fuels, industry, and land-use change) will reach around 41 billion tonnes carbon dioxide in 2017, similar to the record high in 2015.

    • Fascism is entrenched capitalism. It cannot be corrected or even restrained. Most of the promises on GHG are relative (e.g. differing base dates and percentages, or proportional to a unit of GDG). The efforts underway were undertaken because they are seen as a new field of money-making, not because leaderships came to their senses. While the super-rich remain in fantasy, the public thinks this is a low-level issue, e.g.
      – an irritating attempt to restrict personal opportunity, progress or enjoyment
      – a conspiracy to impose a global government
      – a concern of the elite for exotic life-forms or “the planet”
      – irrelevant to to one’s own sub-culture which is magically exempt
      – trivial: receding, in the far future or (the latest spin) several decades away; the worst will only affect “less developed” regions far away.
      – not a major concern as we are prepared.
      – beneficial to some regions in the form of a milder climate [Note 79].
      – amenable to painless, technological or political solutions, just as for past crises, with no need to reduce privileges.

      • No need to confuse us with high sounding words. Just need to advise people to drive less and use public bus. Already the roads are clogged with vehicles with very limited parking space in the city.

  2. Problems related to urban and suburban trees:
    – Unsuitable specie; some even have poisonous fruits. Should be wide, of medium height and well rooted. Can include useful, indigenous trees, e.g. fruit, petai, drumstick (moringai).
    – Trimming only the sides causes the increasing height to increase susceptibility to storms.
    – Infrequent trimming (collusion); the branches even endanger electricity cables.
    – Excessive trimming due to the new business of turning trimmings into wood chips on site.
    – Trees weakened by encroaching sidewalk tarmac, nails for posters, herbicide meant for grass, etc.
    – Food businesses and other sociopaths leaving enough food for crows to multiply, roost in the trees, and excrete onto sidealks and pedestrians.
    – Culture of car worship (materialism) and collusion of authorities with businesses (including the undermining of public transport) leading to the felling of trees for wider roads.

  3. Pg is holding world first seafood. Lucky pg has some acceptable hotel. Otherwise delegates have to stay in rumah tumpangan, backpackers and wong few hoong type Inn.

    Surprise pg has soon many fish farms and generate over 1billion in revenue.

    Should blame those fish farms. Like humans, too many fishes around the pg second crossing. Too many fishes generated heat and warm up the sea. Warm sea not because of building apartment but too many fishes in fish farm.

  4. Anil and Penang Forum ought to celebrate and promote stories of humanity in time of flood crisis like this:

    Silver lining amid flood catastrophe
    https://www.thestar.com.my/opinion/columnists/one-mans-meat/2017/11/11/silver-lining-amid-flood-catastrophe-malaysians-from-all-walks-of-life-reached-out-to-help-those-of/

    Malaysians from all walks of life reached out to help those of differing faiths and ethnic groups during the crisis.

    Thumbs up to surau bilal Sapno Tukijo.

    • Anil more interested in “whacking” the alleged Penang over development matter which has provided bullets for Gelakan annual gathering today?

      • Unfortunately, those responsible for overdevelopment are still in denial mode. Neither is there much recognition of the role of hill-cutting in aggravating the floods and the mud flows we have seen.

      • Why not ask malaysian engrs, architect and contractor not to cut or carryout excavation in building houses in flat ground. As long as there are buildings, a building platform has to be carried out. What about road, water pipes, sewer and most important are cables. Even in flat areas, the ground has to be dug.

  5. Tree planting per sae is good BUT it should be supervised / regulated.
    It is high time the City has an “expert” who advises on the suitability trees planted along the way-side & in recreational park areas. And once planted in public areas, they should be properly & regularly maintained by a crew that know the job, not sub contracted to contractors who know little about tree care.
    The street where I live (Jln Tan Jit Seng in Hillside) is a classic example of poor choice of trees planted & bad maintenance!!!

  6. is there any donation drive that raises fund for the victims’ families? Life must be tough for them as they have not only lost their loved ones but also the breadwinner.

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