Japan nuclear plant: 2nd blast

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A second explosion has struck the Fukushima nuclear plant, raising fresh fears of emissions of radioactive gas.

Such radioactive releases could last months, according to The New York Times:

As the scale of Japan’s nuclear crisis begins to come to light, experts in Japan and the United States say the country is now facing a cascade of accumulating problems that suggest that radioactive releases of steam from the crippled plants could go on for weeks or even months.

Japanese reactor operators now have little choice but to periodically release radioactive steam as part of an emergency cooling process for the fuel of the stricken reactors that may continue for a year or more even after fission has stopped.

Nuclear energy still very safe, you think? Does Malaysia really want to go down this path?

It’s weird to see all those professors on global television stations trying to downplay the seriousness of the situation. Big money is at stake in the nuclear power industry. See the concerns in the business community as reported by Bloomberg here. Not surprisingly, the media damage control and spin began soon after the first explosion.

I hope sanity will prevail in Malaysia.

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13 Comments on "Japan nuclear plant: 2nd blast"

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DCP - Transatlantic Hip Hop
Guest
is anyone asking the important questions? like what is HAARP ? and why have 900,000 + people have died in the last 10 years from earthquakes… this number is not right… maybe there is something else making the world unstable.. again.. WHAT IS HAARP? if you dont know.. you may want to do some research and determine for yourself… its very interesting to say the least. Leave it to the american government to build a … there still is hope. educate the public. spread awareness. ask questions. action. one love. one race. one planet. lets start acting like a family… Read more »
rem
Guest

anil,
sure nuclear plants are dangerous. nobody wants them built next to our homes.
but then environmentalists say we should not dam up dams, and we should not also build big fuel-gas-coal power plants, both to save the environment.
then how? how do we power up?
solar cant be done on large scale as malaysia is small and does not have big deserts, wave power and wind turbine power also cant work on big scale.
any ideas bro?
ie fine for all of us to be scared, but what is the way out please.

Andrew I
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Andrew I

What way out? As it is, there is an excess in the supply of electricity. So, as some people are fond of saying, the question does not arise.

Andrew I
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Andrew I

Also:

At an earlier press conference, Charles Santiago (DAP–Klang) urged Chin to abandon the idea of setting up nuclear power plants.

“Japan embarked on nuclear energy because it lacked domestic fossil fuel alternatives.

“Malaysia has no such excuse because we have oil, gas, biomass, hydro resources and abundant sunshine,” he said.

Andrew I
Guest
Andrew I

…courtesy of the Star.

Sean
Guest
Sean

Solar doesn’t need dedicated plan area. It’s an umbrella. I tried to explain what I keep mumbling about in a blog article this morning, but my graphical skills have let me down. Anybody know a 3D artist with some spare time and an interest in showing “how it could be done”?

http://blog.lolyco.com/sean/2011/03/15/solar-power-in-malaysia-the-residential-area-solar-roof/

Jonny
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Jonny

A grave reminder to the BN government not to have a nuclear reactor in the country if your contractors have proven track records of collapsing (from school ceiling to stadium roof) and leaking (parliment house).

tunglang
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tunglang
Just take a leaf from the western advanced country Germany which rode the nuclear power bandwagon decades ago and now its enlightened citizens decide its high time to move away from nuclear power. Why? They know the hideous cons more than the convenience pros of going nuclear, having learnt the nightmare fright of Chernobyl disaster spreading to their doorsteps. When these seasoned users are quitting the use of nuclear power, we the ‘wet behind in the ears’ are not listening. Perhaps the temptation of tambah kira is too much to give up for the safety of all Malaysians. Use your… Read more »
Gerakan K
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Gerakan K

Anil, if we don’t listen to the experts (professors in this case), then listen to who ???

The opposition leaders of that place ??? Or listen to tunglang at his favorite kopitiam ???

I just don’t understand you. Saje nak buat kecoh.

Andrew I
Guest
Andrew I

Listen to you…after you kena radiation.

Ong Eu Soon
Guest

We can build our nuclear plant. Why not? Just build it next to the office resident of the PM at Putrajaya. The PM will then spend all his time to make sure that it is safe. If anything happen at the 20km radius of evacuation , all those in Putrajaya can be consider gone. Then we can have auto piloted government, no need reformasi or Anwar to oust the bad politicians out of the Bolehland. What a brilliant ideas!

frags
Guest
Japan can’t catch a break huh. I hope everything ends well as soon as possible. As usual. Now that we’ve been hit by a big one, expect seismic activity to be up. Everyone from Nuclear agencies to UN will convene and come up with all sort of new guidelines and rules for nuclear power plants. And there will be more protests. Malaysia will probably chicken out. Because you know if there’s one thing we’ve always been weak at, it’s any preliminary study/environmental impact study. Now that the Prime Minister of Malaysia has seen the risks involved, I’m sure he’ll reconsider.… Read more »
wira
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wira

It’s possibly a question of close to a billion dollar commission on training and after sales services.
If you offer me that money, I will tell you to build it. 🙂