So many people in Penang are not even aware of the environmental implications of the proposed three highways in Penang. So how can they come up with an informed view and position on these projects? By the time they realise what is in store, it might be too late.

The Consumers Association of Penang and Sahabat Alam Malaysia have come up with this revealing statement:

Many Penangites may not be aware that the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) for the proposed three major road projects in Penang has been displayed for public comments since 19 June 2017.

The Consumers’ Association of Penang (CAP) and Sahabat Alam Malaysia (SAM) have written to the Department of Environment (DOE) to request an extension of time for public feedback (which is due on 19 July 2017). We are awaiting a response.

Normally, EIA reports will be displayed for a month and another two weeks will be allocated to submit comments. But not in this case, although it involves a large population of Penang.

Many of those potentially affected by this project may not even know that the road will be very close to their homes, offices, businesses or that it will cut across forested areas and rivers. Some of the impacts are irreversible, such as clearing of forests, cutting of hills and acquisition of houses and land.

What is at stake here? Following is a brief description of the projects as stated in the EIA:

Package 1: North Coastal Paired Road from Tanjung Bungah to Teluk Bahang covering a length of 10.53km of which 2.275km is elevated. The last 3.3km traverses through Bukit Kerajaan Forest Reserve and Teluk Bahang Forest Reserve and ends at the connection to Jalan Teluk Bahang, near the Sekolah Kebangsaan Teluk Bahang.

Package 2: Air Itam – Lebuhraya Tun Dr. Lim Chong Eu By-Pass covering a length of 5.7km of which 3.8km is elevated. The proposed roads are dual two-lane carriageway (four lanes). The route from Lebuhraya Thean Teik skirts around forested and hilly area towards Jalan Bukit Gambir.

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Package 3: Persiaran Gurney – Lebuhraya Tun Dr Lim Chung Eu By-Pass covering a length of 4.075km with a 2.025km double-deck elevated road and a 2.050km double-deck tunnel.

Land use along the alignment

A total of 238 plots of land will be acquired for the three road projects. These involve 3.34 hectares (ha) in two permanent reserved forests, 34.5ha state land forest, 16.5ha of forested land, private land, state and federal land. The total area acquired for Package 1 is 600,555 square metres. Package 2 involves the acquisition of 216,606 square metres and Package 3 involves 9,792 square metres.

Land use distribution along the road corridor (right of way – ROW) in Package 1 covers 348,651 square metres of forests or nearly 52 per cent of the total area. Package 2 ROW covers nearly 45 per cent of forest area (165,334 square metres). Package 3 runs through the town centre consisting of residential, commercial and industrial areas.

Forests and hills

The alignment of Package 1 passing through the Teluk Bahang forested areas will include the removal of one endemic and unique species of tree ie atuna penangiana (kerusing gasing) which is listed as vulnerable.

Among other flora, a total of 253 species of trees has been recorded here. Removal of these vegetation will bring about habitat degradation, fragmentation, transformation or complete loss.

Package 1 and Package 2 traverses through hilly areas with a maximum elevation on 159m (near Moonlight Bay) and 110m (near Menara Greenview) respectively.

Landslides and faults

The road construction will involve the cutting of slopes and rock blasting. According to the records of Jabatan Kerja Raya, landslides have occurred near areas along the alignment of Package 1 and Package 2.

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It is stated in the EIA report that according to the feasibility study report, the alignment for Package 1 crosses over several inferred geological faults, for example Sungai Satu Faults and Sungai Kelian-Sungai Pinang Faults and spanning over the Sungai Siru Fault.

Rivers and flood-prone areas

The proposed project will traverse through various river catchments. A total of 21 rivers may be affected due to the earthworks for the road project. This will lead to soil erosion and sedimentation of the rivers downstream if proper mitigation measures are not in place.

Package 1 will cross seven rivers and the largest catchment areas are Sungai Batu Ferringhi (11.546 square kilometres) and Sungai Teluk Bahang (12.273 square kilometres).

Package 2 crosses part of Paya Terubong and Sungai Dondang towards the Gelugor area. Part of the alignment falls within the Sungai Pinang and Sungai Gelugor river basins, which finally drains into the sea.

Package 2 and Package 3 fall within a flood-prone area. The entire alignment for Package 3, which includes the tunnel component, falls within the flood-prone area of the Sungai Pinang catchment.

Sungai Pinang is a river highly prone to overflowing, and historical data of the water level since 1985 show that maximum water level recorded each year till now surpasses the danger level of 2.70 metres, except for 1988, recording 2.47 metres but way above the warning level of 2.10 metres. The highest flood occurred in 1995 at 3.79 metres.

Noise, air pollution, vibration

Residents along the proposed road corridor will be affected by air pollution, dust, noise and vibration. The EIA states that residents in the highrise buildings will no longer see clear sky but in place, an elevated road passing near their homes and change the visual aesthetics in the area.

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Need for proper public consultation of people affected by major roads

The project proponent ie the state government should hold a public exhibition at major residential areas that will be affected by the road alignment because many of them may not know about these proposed projects. Genuine public opinion should be sought, and the proponent should not merely rely on the survey carried out by the EIA consultants.

More roads not a solution to traffic

Besides the environmental, health and socio-economic impacts arising from construction of all the three roads, CAP and SAM had stated numerous times that the road projects are not needed.

A number of studies have shown that, while new road projects or road widening may offer temporary relief in the short run, it is no real solution to traffic congestion.

New roads create new traffic. Once a new road is fully operational, it will invariably attract more traffic. While some of this may be traffic diverted from more congested roads, the rest will be new motorised traffic as a result of an increase in the use of cars.

The three major road projects proposed now are a revival of the Penang Outer Ring Road (Porr) project served in a different plate. Porr then was vehemently opposed by the people of Penang. Now the people have to decide whether they want more highways traversing through environmentally sensitive areas and residential areas. Public comments to the DoE are vital.

We reiterate that Penang does not need more road projects that are going to compromise sustainable transport options. There must be a comprehensive and rational transport strategy for Penang. The thrust must be on reducing private vehicles on the island instead of encouraging the same.

Say no to more roads.

SM Mohamed Idris is the president of the Consumers’ Association of Penang and Sahabat Alam Malaysia.

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17 COMMENTS

  1. The Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) (Second Schedule) on the proposed Bayan Lepas Light LRT project is now on public display.

    State executive councillor Chow Kon Yeow said the public is encouraged to visit any of the 10 public display locations in Kuala Lumpur, Putrajaya, Seberang Perai and Penang island to give their written feedback on the EIA report.

    It can also be viewed online at:
    doe.gov.my, penang.gov.my
    pgmasterplan.penang.gov.my
    ere.com.my/bllrt.

    The public display of the report is until August 17 and public has until September 2 to submit their written feedback.

    For information on the EIA report, call 03-80242287, fax: 03-80242320 or email to [email protected].

  2. After I published the Grand scheme to (allegedly) steal billions…, all reclamation works at Gurney Whaft stopped immediately. No more activities no more equipments in sight. A prelude to a massive crackdown on the Grand Corruption in Penang.

    • If the reclamation stop suddenly because of your grand report, you cause even greater environmental disaster. Unfinished fill will be washed away and there is no one to see and control the spillway and sediment transport. You should be on watchman duty to ensure penang water will not turn into lim kopi. Don’t sleep well think of kopi o water around gurney and then affect tg bunch and as further away

  3. Heavy rain since early morning also caused flash flood at several areas in the state, as well as landslide at Taman Lau Geok Swee, Paya Terubong here which left a temple buried on the hillside.
    The Taman is right below the axis of unbelievable hillside clearing & cutting to build a road linking to Bukit Gambier.

  4. I hope they cut lots of trees because trees bring lots of leaves and they make the roads dirty. The stupid trees cause floods because of their stupid leaves.

  5. Uncontrollable Car population onisland is the root cause.

    When less cars on the road, then no environmental issues like land clearing for roads and carbon emission.

    A more cost saving and environmental protection strategy for Chief Minister Inc. to consider is to encourage more car sharing approaching eg Uber/Grab hailing services and put more tuk-tuk type of public transport on the island for quick and frequent shuttle services even in remote part away from main roads.

    Of course, the major stumbling block will be again the BinChui factor. Will car-crazed Penangites give up car ownership to support such public transport deployment?

  6. Thanks for sharing Anil. Especially for Penangites who are outstation and can’t view those reports.

    Shocked that forest reserves are involved. CM has always criticized other state governments for clearing forest reserves. Now they are doing the same. Hope CAP, Pg Forum and other NGOs can voice out and use this as one of the points for opposing.

  7. Without that Northern coastal paired road, Teluk Bahang area can hardly develop due to the old and very narrow coastal road. That old road is in fact, very risky of collapse due to the massive sea erosion. Hopefully, no untoward tragedy would happen and the “high cost of damages” must be unbearable ?!

  8. Many Penangites have no concern over environment matter. Most general public too occupied with :
    1) where to eat free food
    2) where can get free gifts
    3) when iphone 8 to be released
    4) what’s the outcome of the tv series on Astro, be in Canto, Hokkien, Korean or Malay dramas.
    5) when to send children to tuition
    6) when best time to change cars
    Etc you can add on

  9. They are ingenious. As the undersea tunnel cannot be justified, they now go for underground tunnels – multi-level at that. Perhaps they can contact Elon Musk: he is looking for a friendly gomen to build vacuum tunnels for transport. Or Richard Branson for faster, more expensive travel through orbital space.

    How long is the concession? What related concessions and guarantees is the gomen giving? Must the contractor have experience, and the capacity to undo or pay for potential damage?

    As an example of related concession, recall the fibre-optic or microwave rights given to PLUS. As an example of related guarantees, recall the many bailouts of the super-projects by super-entrepreuneurs (studies to death by various, federal super-agencies), including LRTs and IPPs. Incidentally, what happened to the suburban gas pipes and fibre-optic cables laid out in some parts of the country; as they are unused, who paid for them?

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