Bloggers lead 2000-strong Singapore rally against internet freedom curbs

Bloggers lead 2000-strong Singapore rally against internet freedom curbs

Some 2000 people gathered at Hong Lim Park in Singapore yesterday in protest against a new regulation that requires certain websites to be licenced.

And young people are speaking out.

Under a new regulation, certain websites must get a licence and pay a S$50,000 bond, which could be forfeited if “prohibited content” that “undermines racial or religious harmony” is published.

A government figure says the regulation won’t include the social media or blogs unless they become news sites.

But some aren’t convinced. Here’s another young Singaporean speaking out:

And speakers at the rally see the new regulation as a threat to their freedom of expression online.

And to think that Malaysia is mulling similar regulations!

5 COMMENTS

  1. Another thing, the size of the crowd is so pathetic despite Singapore being such a densely populated state that it just shows you how mature Singaporeans are. Honestly, they deserve what they are getting because they simply don’t care. If that rally was held in Malaysia, the crowd would be at least and I mean at least 20 times the size. Even a ceramah in a kampung here attracts a larger crowd.

     
  2. We should follow the good things of every country and not the bad. Every country has positive aspects we can emulate and negative aspects we can learn from. Even Dr M’s time he advocated the look east policy to encourage Malaysians to learn from the Japanese who were hardworking and discipline. It does not mean we have to absorb the not so desirable parts of their culture. In terms of democratic practices, Singapore is one of the most undemocratic countries if not the most undemocratic in the world and ranks far lower than Malaysia in all indices which measures freedom and transparency. Now that is not something good to be followed. However, Singapore is good in other aspects that we should indeed follow. For example, their world class transport system, public amenities which are comprehensive and well maintained, urban development which are still green and clean, protection of nature and establishment of parks, adequate sporting and recreation facilities, top-of-the-world education centres and universities, creation of a vibrant economy, high human development index and lastly a high-income nation status. Those are good things to follow. In terms of democratic practices, we will probably do better emulating Myanmar than Sg.

     

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